News Clips for May 21-22, 2020

No settlement in McCluskey $56 million lawsuit against University of Utah

Mediation efforts in a $56 million lawsuit against the University of Utah were unsuccessful, attorney's for Lauren McCluskey's family announced on Wednesday. "The University of Utah participated in a two-day mediation with the McCluskey family and their attorneys. We hoped to reach an agreement that established a legacy that honored Lauren’s memory and benefitted our students through an enduring commitment to best practices in campus safety. We worked very hard to find common ground and, although we were unable to achieve a resolution, we found the discussions helpful."

Report: Campus cop shared explicit photos of Utah student Lauren McCluskey days before her murder

A former university police officer is under investigation for allegedly sharing the photos of the young woman with co-workers. The Salt Lake Tribune reported that the officer, Miguel Deras, downloaded McCluskey’s photos to his personal cellphone and showed at least one of them to a male co-worker, bragging about being able to view the image whenever he wanted.

Utah's move toward green 'new normal' phase could take months, governor suggests

Critical to it is continued diligence in following public health guidelines, said Natalie Gochnour, the director of the University of Utah's Kem C. Gardner Institute and one of the plan's authors. "The most important thing we can do is follow the color-coded health guidance that returns this economy to normal," she said.

Fastest growing city in America? Vineyard, Utah — up 10,687% in the past decade

The city of Vineyard in Utah County — on the site of the former Geneva steel mill — was the fastest growing place in America during the past decade, with an astounding growth rate of 10,687% — meaning it grew to 107 times its original size. It skyrocketed from a tiny town of 110 people in 2010 to 11,866 in 2019, according to estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

OSHA opens case with Utah company accused by former employee of letting COVID-19 spread

Leslie Francis, distinguished professor of law and philosophy at the University of Utah, said she often sees people claim something falls under HIPAA when it is not applicable. “Just a normal employer is not a HIPAA covered entity nor is an employee,” she said, “It is highly likely that an employer has health information about employees that is protected by other statutes.”

What can Utahns really learn from a COVID-19 antibody test?

The University of Utah is testing 10,000 people randomly selected in four counties to gauge infection rates.

‘Science by press release’: Sudden rise of vaccine developer Moderna rankles some in scientific establishment

Moderna Inc., a nearly 10-year-old Massachusetts-based biotech company, announced "positive" indications from their early work on a potential vaccine against the novel coronavirus.Dr. Andrew Pavia, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at the University of Utah, criticized the decision to publicize preliminary results. "Good science requires that we can see the methods and the details of the results," Dr. Pavia told ABC News. "It is a product of the pressures of the pandemic, but it leaves many questions unanswered."

Tropical forests soak up huge amounts of greenhouse gas. Climate change could end that

Today in Science, researchers report that measurements of carbon storage and growing conditions for some 500,000 trees around the world suggest some tropical forests, particularly in Africa and Asia, will—if left intact—continue to sequester large amounts of carbon even as global temperatures rise. But only up to a point. “There are certain levels where forests can’t respond,” says William Anderegg, a forest ecologist at the University of Utah.

Ultrasound brain stimulation changes monkey behavior directly

The brain is a difficult organ to treat – medications have a variety of side effects and surgery is dangerous and invasive. But now, researchers at the University of Utah have shown how ultrasound can be used to affect specific regions of the brain, and even influence behavior in monkeys.

Letter: Disband the University of Utah Police Department

Comments for Letter: Disband the University of Utah Police Department

Lori Loughlin ‘ended up with a pretty reasonable deal,’ University of Utah professor says

Shima Baradaran Baughman, a professor of law at the University of Utah College of Law, said this is a good deal: “Given how this case started, and the public outrage, I think Loughlin and her husband ended up with a pretty reasonable deal.” “If I were charging, I would have preferred to see higher restitution payments and no incarceration given that incarceration just costs the state money and has no real positive benefits.”

Utah Child Shows Signs Of Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome

“It’s a very new syndrome. So, we’re learning a lot as we go,” said Dr. Andrew Pavia, Pediatric Infectious Disease, University of Utah Health and Primary Children’s Hospital.

‘Very scary’: New inflammatory syndrome affecting some Utah kids after COVID-19 infections

“It sounds very scary,” Dr. Pavia said Thursday. Dr. Andrew Pavia, is a Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist for University of Utah Health and Primary Children’s Hospital. “Because any time you associate the word new with a disease of children as parents we become very concerned.”

Utah researchers collect antibody-rich plasma for COVID-19 treatment

“The hope is that it helps them do better,” said Dr. Ryan Metcalf, medical director at ARUP and University of Utah Transfusion Services. He said preliminary findings of the FDA-sponsored, Mayo Clinic-led expanded access treatment protocol using donated plasma to treat hospitalized COVID-19 patients shows it is not hurting them. “As far as we can tell, it is not causing harm,” he said, adding that a more randomized controlled clinical trial is needed to prove it works.

Utah Supreme Court dismisses ACLU’s coronavirus lawsuit targeted at county jails

Paul Cassell, a University of Utah law professor who represented several crime victims who were part of the litigation, similarly was critical of the ACLU. “This ill-conceived case was never anything but a distraction to the efforts of the state and the counties to try to deal with a challenging situation,” he said. “The Supreme Court's summary dismissal properly ends that distraction.”

Cool Science Radio - May 21, 2020

Cool Science Radio speaks with Dr. Mark Durham from the University of Utah School of Dentistry. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) in teaching and in dental practice will improve dental health across the globe as students are learning exacting procedures like root canals using VR long before they ever dive into the mouth of a real person.

McAdams donates plasma to COVID-19 treatment research

ARUP Laboratories and University of Utah Health are researching the effectiveness of convalescent plasma as a possible COVID-19 treatment.

Live Mic: Navajo Nation takes on coronavirus onslaught

Heather Tanana, a research law professor at the University of Utah, joined Lee Lonsberry on Live Mic to explain the efforts behind Utah Tribal COVID-19 Relief. “Some of us are practicing attorneys. Some of us are social workers. We’re all dealing with Indian Child welfare issues. As the pandemic started progressing . . . we were hearing a lot of feedback and concern growing about the infection rate rising in our tribal communities.” she said.

Inequitable exposure to air pollution in local schools, and the data on pandemic air quality

This week on In the Hive, a new study from the University of Utah highlights unequal exposure to air pollution for school children in predominantly minority and low income schools in Salt Lake County. We hear from the lead author of that study. Sara Grineski, professor of sociology and environmental studies at the University of Utah

Men's Beard Helps Absorb Impact Of A Punch, New Study Finds

Researchers led by David Carrier of the School of Biological Sciences say that flowing beards might have been used to aid fight-hungry men absorb blows to their heads. Results of the study, which may give more reason for men with bountiful beards to be more confident, were published in the journal Integrative Organismal Biology.

‘Be very careful about giving people a false sense of security’: Should you get a coronavirus antibody test?

Daniel Leung, an infectious disease physician-researcher at University of Utah Health, recommended leaving it up to public-health and medical practitioners to initiate serological testing. “I know people are trying to take their health in their own hands,” he said, “but I don’t think a serology test is the right way to do it.”

Coronavirus cases surpass 5 million; New laws expected to crack down on Hong Kong; Cyclone Amphan kills dozens

White House officials are reportedly looking to restrict all US foreign worker programs, including OPT. “So, the future right now, it's totally uncertain,” said Renan Pereira, an international student from Brazil, who is wrapping up his bachelor’s degree in finance at The University of Utah.

Sneezing on a smartphone:

Professor Massood Tabib-Azar, an engineer at the University of Utah in the United States is leading a project to create a sensor that users can plug into their smartphones' charging port and that can tell whether they are infected or not within one minute if they sneeze or cough on it.

Opinion: We really do just need one another

In a study of couples, social psychologist Lisa Diamond of the University of Utah observed minor withdrawal-like symptoms, such as irritability and sleep disturbances, along with an increase in cortisol in subjects after they were separated four to seven days. Participants who reported high anxiety about their relationships had the biggest spikes in the stress hormone levels.

Men are taking on (slightly) more household chores amid the coronavirus pandemic

Utah, found that 20 percent of men say they are overseeing home schooling, while only 3 percent of women agree. The new survey did find, however, a 58 percent leap in the percentage of parents who report sharing routine housework relatively equally with their partner — from 26 percent before the pandemic to 41 percent during it.

Woman 'almost boiled to death' after sneaking into national park during lockdown

University of Utah professor Jamie Farrell, who is something of a Yellowstone expert told Live Science : "Are we all going to die if Yellowstone erupts? Almost certainly the answer is no.” He said that, while there would be widespread loss of life and economic damage it probably wouldn’t be an extinction-level event: "There have been quite a few super-eruptions in the past couple million years, and we're still around."

FILED UNDER: UTAH POLICE/COURTS FEATURED Mediation talks between McCluskeys, University of Utah, end with no agreement

Mediation talks between Lauren McCluskey’s parents and the University of Utah have ended without an agreement, attorneys for Matt and Jill McCluskey announced Wednesday.

Lauren McCluskey’s parents did not reach a settlement with the University of Utah during mediation this week

After two days of mediation, the parents of slain track star Lauren McCluskey did not reach a settlement with the University of Utah over their $56 million lawsuit alleging the school could have done more to protect their daughter.

Utah university police officer accused of keeping explicit photos of murder victim, 21, under investigation

University of Utah police officer is under investigation for allegedly keeping explicit photos of a 21-year-old college student before her 2018 shooting death.

Logan Mayor weighs in on police investigation

“You always have to realize there are always two sides to every story and that’s what we are trying to get to with the investigation. Actually, I think the POST investigations that you mentioned…initially we were going to do the investigation in-house. But then we got thinking, we could be seen as suspect, if it’s in-house. Is it really a thorough, unbiased investigation?” explained Mayor Daines.

Mediation talks between McCluskey’s and U fail, lawsuit moving forward

Mediation talks between Lauren McCluskey’s parents and the University of Utah have ended without an agreement.

Lauren McCluskey and COVID–19 in southeastern Utah

Investigations are launched into the alleged actions of a former University of Utah police officer in the Lauren McCluskey case.No settlement is reached between the parents of the slain student athlete and the university.

Probe launched into explicit photo claims in Wash. student's death

The state will open a new investigation into allegations that a University of Utah police officer showed off explicit photos in an extortion case reported by a Pullman, Wash., student who was later killed, a case that has roiled the institution.

Census: Herriman, Vineyard swelled as Utah home-building boomed again last year

Herriman and Vineyard have long been on the radar of state demographers, said Pamela Perlich, the director of demographic research at the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute. “We knew that they were growing at extraordinary rates within the state,” said Perlich, who analyzed the census release and shared her findings with the Deseret News. “That was a surprise to me, that they popped up to the top of the entire nation.”

‘Science by press release’: Sudden rise of vaccine developer Moderna rankles some in scientific establishment

Dr. Andrew Pavia, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at the University of Utah, raised concerns of publicizing preliminary results. "Good science requires that we can see the methods and the details of the results," Dr. Pavia told ABC News. "It is a product of the pressures of the pandemic, but it leaves many questions unanswered."

Moderna's Top Choice U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Only 'Bunch of Opinions' Unsupported by Valid Data, Says Experts

Dr. Andrew Pavia, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at the University of Utah, raised concerns of publicizing preliminary results. "Good science requires that we can see the methods and the details of the results," Dr. Pavia told ABC News. "It is a product of the pressures of the pandemic, but it leaves many questions unanswered."

COVID-19 ANTIBODY TEST: SCIENTISTS EXPLAIN THE MOST COMPELLING REASON TO GET TESTED

Knowing where the virus has spread and to whom is an essential step that can determine how and when governments lift quarantine measures. But that doesn't necessarily mean you should go to your doctor and demand an antibody test, Daniel Leung, an associate professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah, tells Inverse. “For an individual just to know whether you’ve had the disease or not, I don’t recommend it,” Leung says. “There’s almost no use case for individual use by a consumer.”